Bicycles

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Re: Bicycles

Postby Jonathan » Sat Jul 29, 2017 12:42 am

Does the Shimano 105 have a bad rep or something? Twice now this summer I've had people ask me about that and my (internal) reaction is, "Why do you give a fuck?" These are non-cyclists thinking about buying a bike, for the record.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:27 pm

I don't know why they'd be asking about it. Maybe because it's Shimano's only groupset that has a name that's a number? It's midrange and it's fine. The current 105 is basically the prior model Ultegra. Both are 11 speed. All you really get with (mechanical) Ultegra nowadays is some weight savings (and having "ULTEGRA" printed on your brake levers).

Or they could go Dura-Ace, spend a ton more money, have "DURA-ACE" on their brake levers, be the object of other cyclists' envy, and have a groupset that's more fragile.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:45 pm

I guess it just depends on whether 300 g is worth $450 to you.

Interestingly, 105 brakes can support a 28 mm tire whereas Ultegra only goes up to 25 mm. Though I think there's a new version of Ultegra out since that article.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Tue Mar 26, 2019 5:06 pm

I got an old steel Trek frame for free. Apparently it was sitting in a garage in Oakland until the owner had the wheels stolen off the bike they were riding so they took the wheels off the Trek so they could keep riding the other bike. Maggie and I had taken a bike repair class here and the teacher offered the frame up for free.

I looked up the serial number and it's a 21" 1986 Trek 400 Elance. The paint is chipped in a few places but it seems to be in pretty good condition otherwise. It has the original Shimano 600 SIS derailleurs and shifters.

I thought about keeping the bike in "vintage" condition, which would require me to get an old set of wheels with 126 mm rear hubs with a 6-speed freewheel. I found one in good condition on eBay but it was $220, which seemed a bit much to do to "restore" the bike. Maggie made the point that if we're going to spend money on it, we should end up with a bike I'm actually going to ride. Also, I discovered that the cable bolt on the rear derailleur is completely stripped, and I'm not sure how to remove it short of getting it drilled out, which doesn't seem worth it.

So instead I decided to cold-set the frame to 130 mm to be able to fit modern wheels and modern cassette, and get a new 11 speed groupset. I still need to make an improvised tool to align the forkends. I believe the frame should be able to fit at least 700x30c (and possibly 700x32c) tires, so I was thinking of setting it up as an "all-road" bike that is not quite a full-on gravel bike but can ride on gravel ok.

Next up is removing the bottom bracket and servicing the headset. I'll probably keep the existing stem. I may need to replace the handlebars, they are a little bit on the narrow side.

I recently snapped my derailleur hanger on a climb in Del Mar near Summer Cycles, a boutique bike shop that sells custom frames (and just happened to be the bike shop where Maggie and I took the repair class). They ordered me a new hanger, RD, and chain (all were completely fucked up), and I put the parts on in the repair class. Until it was finished they let me ride one of their demo bikes, an aluminum Gaulzetti with Campagnolo Chorus. After riding the Campagnolo groupset I'm kind of obsessed with it. It's hard to describe but there's something viscerally satisfying about the ergonomics and the shifting and braking feel. So I'm thinking of slapping a Campagnolo Centaur groupset on it. The silver version looks much nicer than the black, but comes with a premium. I can save a little bit by omitting the cassette, since I won't be using those on my wheels (which obviously have Shimano hubs). All 11-speed drivetrains are apparently cross-compatible. Going with a Shimano 11-speed chain means I don't need to mess around with a Campagnolo chain, which apparently requires a $150 proprietary chain tool.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:33 pm

I will need long reach brake calipers to clear a tire over 28c.

The brakes on my frame may work, it looks like the stock brakes on my frame were "standard reach," which is considered "long reach" these days.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby quantus » Mon Apr 01, 2019 5:04 pm

Alan wrote:Also, I discovered that the cable bolt on the rear derailleur is completely stripped, and I'm not sure how to remove it short of getting it drilled out, which doesn't seem worth it.

This has worked well for me... https://smile.amazon.com/Speed-Out-As-S ... 00N98I9IU/ I got a set for $5 from Fry's on sale a couple years ago and they've come in handy a few times. As recently as last week I used them to get a stripped screw out of an under-desk set of drawers screwed into the desktop above. If it's not a hex bolt, and an actual bolt, then maybe a set of vice-grips (or 2) can get enough purchase on the outside of it (and the opposing nut)?
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Mon Apr 01, 2019 11:08 pm

It's rounded on the outsides (and no nut) so I can't grip it in any way, but that extractor would probably do the trick.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Mon Apr 01, 2019 11:16 pm

Spent some time over the weekend removing the bottom bracket, cleaning the bottom bracket shell, and servicing the headset. Had a scary moment when one of the headset bearings slipped out of the retaining ring (which would have mostly just been a pain to have to go back to the hardware store to get a single tiny bearing) but I was able to find it.

I measured the handlebars and they are way too narrow, they are 36 cm and I'm used to 42 cm (center to center). That opened up a whole 'nother can of worms regarding quill stem and handlebar standards. My stem is the old timey standard of 25.4 mm diameter and pretty much all modern handlebars are either 26 mm or 31.8 mm. It's apparently a terrible idea to shove a 26 mm diameter handlebar into the 25.4 mm stem, so my options seem to be to either get a 25.4 mm diameter handlebar from eBay or get a new stem and new handlebars. The cost difference depends on how expensive a stem I get, but could be as little as $30. The main benefit is that it'll be easier to find handlebars in good condition in the right characteristics (width, drop, and reach).

I'm also playing around the the idea of flared handlebars.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:33 pm

Decided to keep my existing stem because I found a 25.4 mm handlebar that'll work, the Nitto Classic 115. They have a slight 10 degree flare.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Thu Apr 04, 2019 6:55 pm

I ended up getting the silver Campagnolo Centaur groupset, minus the cassette and the brakes, which knocked $75 off the price. I will be using a Shimano cassette, and will stick with the brakes that are on the frame for now. If I get new brakes they would be medium-reach ones anyway. It'll be a few weeks before I have time to put those on. After that will be cables and cable housing and cosmetic adjustments like wrapping handlebars.

The saddle on the bike is this one. Not a bad saddle and a relatively new one, but it's made for a woman's anatomy. I'll either try out some saddles at a bike shop or go with a Brooks for a classic look.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Alan » Tue May 07, 2019 6:08 pm

I finished the bike last week. Cutting the cable housings was a bit of an adventure, I think I cut the front brake housing a little short which will probably lead to premature cable wear but I don't think it's a big enough problem to buy extra cable housing for it. I then had an issue with the chain - Campagnolo chains have a chain link pin rather than a quick-link, and the pin has a portion that is used to guide the pin into the chain that you break off afterward. Unfortunately, mine broke off before I was able to get the pin in, so I spent 30 min with a pair of tweezers steadying the pin while using the chain tool one handed to drive the pin into the chain. It was a really unpleasant experience but I managed to get it in.

The bike rides very nicely, it feels really smooth on pavement. The Campy shifters feel very solid and give good feedback. It's obviously heavier than my carbon fiber bike but it is still a road bike so it's not heavy by any means.

bike finished small.jpg
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The silver groupset fits the aesthetic very well.

bike drivetrain small.jpg
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I would've preferred the brake housing to be 1-2 cm longer but it's probably fine.

bike front small.jpg
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The front brake seems to be in better shape than the rear brake. I'm debating getting new brake pads first to see whether that's enough or whether I'll need to get new brakes altogether. This is probably what I'd go with.

The saddle seems fine for now. I am probably going to upgrade the saddle on my Ridley sometime this year and when I do that I'll just put that one on this bike. It's a white saddle which will look better along with the white bar tape and the white cable housing.
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Re: Bicycles

Postby Dave » Wed May 08, 2019 12:09 am

Looks good! I'm still riding my mountain bike from 1993 around the neighborhood with the fam! It squeecks
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Re: Bicycles

Postby quantus » Wed May 08, 2019 12:28 am

I just took off Erik's training wheels. Too bad the tube I repaired the flat in, got another flat when he was taking his first longer ride down the street. Probably a spoke or something broke free and is piercing the tube :-\ It's the rear wheel, so taking the wheel off is more of a pain. yay
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